Anchoring the Back Foot & Hip Thrust: Why YOUR Swing Won’t Succeed Without It

Written By: Chas Pippitt

Lower Body Mechanics:  The Foundation of the Swing

The lower body swings the bat.  Many coaches under appreciate this fact.  They teach hitting from the top down, emphasizing the hands, the hands, the hands — teaching lower body mechanics as an afterthought, a timing mechanism. It is understandable, then, that even the world’s best hitters sometimes describe their own mechanics in hands first/top down language.  But game footage of these players tells a different story: an elite swing is a lower body movement.

The Rear Foot:  The Anchor of the Swing

Many coaches talk about the back foot in one of two ways:  as an object that turns and ‘squishes the bug’ or as spring that ‘pushes’ the body forward so that the hitter can ‘get to his back toe.’  Both of these ideas are stunting or stopping the growth of power and consistency in hitters today.

Whether you teach a ‘sway’ or ‘shift’ load, where the weight moves from centered to back towards the catcher, or a ‘coil’ load, where the front hip rotates inward while the shoulders stay straight, there is one constant.  The constant is that the hitter must keep the rear knee inside the instep of the rear foot and the top of the kneecap inside the shoe line.  The double inside load drives the rear foot big toe and ball into the ground, creating your anchor.

Alex Rios Hitting Mechanics, Alex Rios Baseball Rebellion, Baseball Rebellion, Baseball Hitting Drills, Baseball Load hitting

Alex Rios in the double inside load position. The Yellow line shows the vertical plane and the red dots are the outside of the rear knee and the inside of the rear foot.

Albert Pujols hitting mechanics, albert pujols load baseball, hitting drills, baseball rebellion, pujols load, pujols swing

Albert Pujols also using a double inside load.

Rios and Pujols, in these pictures, are anchored to the ground with the rear ball of their back feet and the rear big toe, there is not weight on the outside of either of their back foot pinky toe.  Both guys’ back hip is loaded and supporting of the upper halves.  This load allows lower body mechanics to work correctly and is the linchpin in allowing the shoulders to support the hands and create a whipping action of the bat around the body and around the hands.

Lower body mechanics allow for a top level swing to be supported, efficient, coordinated, and suddenly explosive.  Load into the back hip with a double inside load and create the super strong support structure that all elite swings are built on.  Many common misconceptions in upper body mechanics are spawned from poor and incorrect lower body mechanical teaching.

Lower Body Mechanics Myths:  Squish the Bug

Talking about the back foot ‘turning’ or ‘squishing the bug’ is a common problem.  This teaches players to turn the rear foot inward, to turn the rear knee, to turn the rear hip.  Stand up and try something for me.

Load however you like, sway/shift or coil inward.  Now, spin your back foot so that the shoelaces are forward facing. This will turn your knee without turning your hips…feel powerful?  I Didn’t think so.  Even if you kept your shoulders facing the pitcher, you never were ‘forced’ to turn the hips because the hip socket is a ‘ball’ socket giving our legs more freedom of movement.  This load as a way to get the back foot to ‘turn’ does not create the needed torque for a maximum power/bat speed swing.

Many coaches teach “squish the bug” lower half mechanics because it gives kids an easy way to rotate the back foot.  But what that cue causes is young hitters getting into the bad habit of putting too much emphasis on back foot & ankle activation, which can result in a more dominant role of the upper body because the hips aren’t optimally swinging the bat.  As a result, the upper body has to chip in, thanks to poor hip engagement.  So, we turn the hip, which turns the knee, which turns the ankle, NOT the other way around.  Double inside loading and anchoring the back foot helps set the hips up for optimal thrust in the swing.

Lower Body Mechanics Myths:  Get to the Toe

The idea that the back calf muscle does much more than support the weight of the hitter at contact is also an issue.  How many times have we heard a coach tell a hitter to ‘push’ with his back foot, or ‘drive his knee to the pitcher’? If the answer to that question is more than once…then really the answer is ‘too many’.   Trial two will consist of the ‘get on the toe’ position to see if we can generate rotational power

This time, after loading however you like, use your rear leg calf muscle to ‘push’ your weight forward onto your front foot while turning the hips.  Do you feel strong and balanced?  Did your head stay still?  Are you in an athletic position?  The answer to all these questions is ‘no’.  Also, if you’re gaining ground with your spine in the swing motion, how are you generating any torque within the core muscles of the body?

Now: make an adjustment.

This time, either coil or sway into your load, but this time, keep the rear knee inside the instep of the rear foot and the kneecap inside the tips of your toes.  This action, a D.I.L., weights the instep of the rear foot, creating a strong, immobile anchor, to allow the rear hip to turn the knee.  While doing this, keep the back foot straight.  You can lift the back foot heel, but do not turn the laces of your shoe.  Do this without turning the shoulders…so the hips are turned, the back foot is not…and the shoulders are still straight, with the lead shoulder pointing at the pitcher.  Feel that stretching torque inside your core?  Congratulations, you have found the thrusted position – the first step to unlocking the powerful and explosive force of lower body swinging.

chas pippitt, drive developer, double inside load, baseball rebellion hitting loadchas pippitt, baseball rebellion, anchor back foot, double inside load, baseball hitting drillschas pippitt, baseball rebellion, baseball load, super thrust

 

(Images 3-5 Above: These are Chas Pippitt (me) using the Drive Developer and the I.T.S. Baseball Hitting System to build and improve the load and thrusted positions within the top level baseball swing.  I didn’t include a side view of my ‘Thrusted Position’ because it was blurry…so I used a slightly better player instead…)

 Josh Hamilton Hitting Mechanics, Josh Hamilton Double Inside Load, Superthrust, baseball rebellion

Josh Hamilton’s beautiful lower body mechanic: (1) Anchored Rear Foot (2) Hips turned, knee and foot still with the toes pointing towards the dugout with weight on instep of back foot

The bottom line?

Never let your mechanics limit you.  Anyone can learn this, but few take the time to understand the truth about hitting. Instead, many take the advice of people who ‘should know,’ instead of people who spend their lives researching, teaching, and theorizing about the art of hitting.

**Numerous orthopedic surgeons were consulted in the writing of this article**

**Tim Coffield, former ACC player and CSCS certified strength coach contributed to this article.**

Posted in:

89
Leave a Reply

avatar
38 Comment threads
51 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
34 Comment authors
NoahDarryl WilsonBrianJayTravis K. Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
jesse
Guest
jesse

hey can you please explain everything that occurs in the swing after where you left off in the article. Thanks.

chas
Member

Jesse,

The plan is to make an ongoing discussion about baseball hitting mechanics theory and philosophy over time.

Periodically, I will write a new article, and people can comment on it and send in their own questions in the meantime.

I will get to some upper body stuff in my next article very shortly. In the meantime, hold tight, we just started, and the really exciting articles are still in development.

Thanks for reading,

Chas –

Hess
Guest
Hess

Great blog very informative keep them comming

Thanks

Jerry
Guest
Jerry

Chas, my son has excellent power, much of which is due to lower body explosiveness as you state…however, sometimes he collapses (tilts) his backside and swings under good pitches to hit…any suggestions? Jerry

chas
Member

Jerry,

Just to be clear, I was stating that it was hard to diagnose the problem based on your description…as there could be some upper body/arm/wrist problems as well. Once again, pictures or video would enhance all of our abilities to understand the issue at hand.

We at BaseballHittingRebellion.com want to help with any and all issues of the baseball swing…and softball swing for that matter.

Thanks again, look forward to your response!

Chas –

Joey Myers
Guest
Joey Myers

Great stuff Chas, and thank you Jesse, Hess, and Jerry for the kudos and swing issues. I just want you all to know, I wouldn’t endorse just anybody to host a Swing Smarter sponsored blog, Chas is the real deal, and you guys are in GREAT hands 🙂 Please keep up the dialogue, tell your friends because there’s lots of more great information to come!

Eddie
Guest
Eddie

I coach high school girls fast pitch softball. To be short and to the point I face two consistent problems: 1) flying away with the front shoulder which leads to other problems; spinning, casting of the hands head leaving with shoulder, etc. Do you have any suggestions or drills to help correct this? 2) width of feet; I was taught the greater the width of the stance/stride = greater distance the bat has to travel to hit the ball. Also because of the wider stance the more balls we take off the foot, ankle and shin. Am I wrong about… Read more »

jmyers
Guest
jmyers

Eddie, Chas hit it right on the head…As you may know, a lot of the mechanics on SwingSmarter.com were ala Down & Through, which will be changing soon, believe me 😉 There are just too many problems with the old stale way of hitting D&T, consistency isn’t there, and we’re swinging with smaller muscles. I used to think a longer bat path was defeating to bat speed, and thanks to my relationship with Chas, and him pulling me to the “dark side” of hitting technique, and getting me to rebel against what was thought of in the mainstream as the… Read more »

Tim
Guest
Tim

Chas and Joey, my six yr old immediately got results in the pop in his bat from working on the hip rotation spoken of in the Lower half mechanics post. When his feet are right and the hips rotate he puts a real charge into the ball. The issue now seems to be the consistancy with what his feet are doing. When there not doing the above mentioned they are doing one of two things. Either his feet grow roots and the hips then don’t turn and then he’s just arm swinging. The orther side of the coin is he… Read more »

chas
Member

Tim, Feet issues are the most common problems with kids under the age of 6…as just in terms of pure balance and coordination, they are way behind where they will be in just a few short years. My honest advice to correct his feet is two fold: 1: Make sure that he’s ALWAYS lined up the same in the box, not just the same distance apart, but also the same line towards the pticher or slightly open, never closed…that his feet are pointed towards the opposite batters box and not with open toe’d duck feet. That consistancy is difficult to… Read more »

Keith
Guest
Keith

I enjoyed the article, I am a 40 year old that is planning on getting back into the game after several years playing youth baseball through 2 years at the community college level. My question is are there some drills I can utilize with performing dry swings to keep my weight from transferring outside the rear foot and outside the front foot. I look forward to your assistance.

chas
Member

Keith, Welcome back to the greatest game on earth! Honestly, my first response is stretch…and stay healthy. One of my hitter’s fathers is about your age and he went back…and promptly broke an ankle…so be careful. As far as the weight shift issue, loading and dry swinging with the help of a mirror is key, and video your swings with a tri-pod when you are hitting, even if it’s off a tee, so you can check that double-inside-load starting position and that your back hip is thrusting inward before your rear foot turns. As far as the front foot goes,… Read more »

greg
Guest
greg

Double inside load? Does this refer to loading the hips and rolling the knee inside the foot? not sure. Thanks. I am working with a softball player that pushes up and rolls her wrist early. I am trying to get her to push into her front leg and not roll so early.

chas
Member

Greg,

I’m not sure what’s not to get. Read the article listed above and the double inside load question should be answered…

Greg, what does she push up?

On wrist rolling: Greg, many times ‘wrist rolling’ is a symptom of a problem and not the real problem at all…which is probably forward weight shift.

Get her double inside loading like the players above and turning her hip first…before all other movement after the load or coil action.

Chas –

greg
Guest
greg

Sorry, gotta keep it super simple for me…The second load is the load on the back leg with the knee inside the back foot. This helps you drive the back knee and back hip, on the swing, through the position that gets the back kneecap in front of the belly button. With this you gain more power from the lower half.

Am I close?

JB
Guest
JB

Hey i have a question on how you launch the hips because i learned the thrust position and now i am working on turning the hips. Would i use the bottom abs to help me level them out like in the swing smarter article. Or is there a different method of doin it without pushing off or squishing the bug.

jmyers
Guest
jmyers

@JB,

Using the lower abdominals, like in the Swing Smarter article about “kinked/unkinked hose” technique helps to level out the pelvic floor, which in leyman’s terms opens up energy communication between the upper & lower body through the core muscles. So yes, it would help in getting ultimate torque between the two different gears (upper v. lower body). However, just doing the unkinked hose technique will NOT stop you from rotating through the ankle first.

Thanks for the comment JB!

Joe
Guest
Joe

Hey I Known this doesn’t pertain to this article but is there any way i can get advice on a good 2 strike approach thanks.

jmyers
Guest
jmyers

@Joe: you can get 2-Strike Approach 101 by subscribing to the Swing Smarter.com Newsletter called The Swing Architect. Lots of cool benefits for being apart of the team 🙂

Andrew Rando
Member
Andrew Rando

Great info! Hope this question isn’t to petty? In relation to the knee cap inside the big toe; would it make any difference if the foot is flared out or Straight out (perpendicular)?

Troy
Guest
Troy

I have a 9yr son who is playing semi competitive baseball and is struggling to get his lower body involved in his swing. He makes contact well but has no power. I started last week with the behind the back bat drill and he is still struggling to get the concept. Just wondering if there is any other way to get him to start using his hips/legs more? Also wanted to say thank you for the website. Your explanations of the swing are excellent for us parents who are trying to help are kids get better even with out knowing… Read more »

jmyers
Guest
jmyers

Hey Troy, Chas will be able to go into more depth on this issue than me, but with my kids who have a hard time “feeling” the lower half working, they have to change their idea of what’s swinging the bat. What I mean by that is… They have to think more twisting with their core and hips, not turning the back foot or leg, or “squishing the bug” as I once taught. I teach my kids to NOT drive off the back leg, but to let the back leg “slot” into an ideal “L” position as the core and… Read more »

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

Thank you for answering my question. I will give it a try, working on it in fall ball and I will come back and give an update in a few months.

Thanks,
Troy

chas
Member

Troy, I’d say two things, first, don’t get impatient or let him get frustrated with his progress. You said it best when you said: ‘I started last week….and he’s still struggling to get the concept’ Basically, he SHOULD be struggling still! Hitting a baseball IS a STRUGGLE! That’s why it’s so hard but so satisfying when you get good at it. 2nd, Ditch the bat behind the back drill as that drill makes your shoulders turn WITH the hips instead of AFTER the hips. Try this instead: go to my article on lower body mechanics. Look at the ‘thrusted position’… Read more »

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

Thank you for answering my question. I will give it a try, working on it in fall ball and I will come back and give an update in a few months.

Thank you and Please continue educating us all,

Troy

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

I just have a quick question involving the hands. First do the hands have any thing to do with creating thrust? Also after the double inside load what should the hands do to follow that load (for example knob to catcher?) After the load i usually get into a palm up palm down position with wrist snap. I just wanted you to see if that is the right mindset. Thanks for everything.

JK Whited
Editor

Anonymous? What an interesting name. Is that German? Your mindset is right! Palm up palm down is where we want to be, but it is all about how we get there. To answer the first question, the hands have nothing to do with thrust per say, as long they stay connected to your back shoulder. Thrust is really achieved when there is separation from our core/hips and our hands/shoulder. If our hands and hip thrust go at once, “true” thrust has not been accomplished. Your second question about the hands and what they do during the load, such as pointing… Read more »

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

“Your mindset is right! Palm up palm down is where we want to be, but it is all about how we get there.”

what are the steps to get there?

JK Whited
Editor

The best way to get to the strong palm up palm down position is with a good pivot of the hands and not the barrel. When we pivot our hands (not the barrel or push the knob) we start the accelerated bat into the hitting zone super deep. Keeping our hands and back shoulder “married” we continue the barrel through the hitting zone to contact, and eventually through extension. Most wrist and hand issues come at the pivot point like I stated before. Pushing the knob forward locks the hand and wrists in a weak position even though you may… Read more »

Ken
Guest
Ken

Hey chas i just have a question involving the transfer of weight. Im having a little issue in which i thrust the back hip but when it comes to turning it with my core i jump out on my front foot a little and become a front foot hitter. Do you think by trying to stay on the ball of my back foot as long as possible and letting my core pull me through will help me stay back more? Any tips or advice. I Think i might be lifting the back heel a little too much which might be… Read more »

JK Whited
Editor

Ken, The big thing to look at in your case is the angle of your front leg during and at the finish of your swing. Is your chest over your front leg or do you have a nice shallow angle with your chest back? Right from the start it sounds like you might be pushing but we are having trouble understanding the question. I say this because if you do generate good hip thrust correctly, you will not be up on your front side like you say you are. Please refer to the videos in the “super thrust” article in… Read more »

Andrew Rando
Member
Andrew Rando

Hi Chas, when you pivot your hands, does the bat point straight back or directly 90 degrees behind the batter or in-between those two (45 Degrees) Thanks!

chas
Member

Andy, Think about what you’re trying to do. You’re trying to accelerate the barrel of the bat into the hitting area with your hip turn and your wrist snap. What’s the best way to do that? pointing the knob of the bat to the pitcher? or pointing the knob of the bat into the other batters box? The key is getting to palm up/palm down position with your hands as fast as possible and that is only allowed if you point the knob into the opposite batters box. That will allow the bat not only to whip around your spine… Read more »

Brian
Guest
Brian

Hi Chas, While I have been following your stuff for only a short while, I have to say you are a bright light illuminating the sometimes confusing world of hitting instruction ;). My question is in regards to hip thrust, what strength and/or flexibility work do you specifically recommend to help with a proper hip thrust? I work with youth and high school athletes who often present with weak and/or tight hips due to the enormous mount of sitting they do each day. I find this inhibits a good hip thrust. What do you recommend to help improve hip strength… Read more »

Joey Myers
Guest
Joey Myers

Hey Brian, Joey Myers from Swing Smarter here… This is my favorite subject and area of expertise. I’m currently working on a program right now for Junior High and High School baseball players and coaches addressing one of the many issues with mobility and stability problems within the swing, and how improving those will boost hip thrust and spinal tilt. And, we all know how those two crazy devils increase the amount of stand up doubles for a hitter. Please subscribe either to the BBHR Newsletter on the homepage or to SwingSmarter.com to get updated on when that comes out.… Read more »

FK
Guest
FK

Chas, I’m confused and must be missing something regarding your theory on lower body mechanics: squish the bug. You mention that squishing the bug will stunt your hitting power and “don’t turn the laces of your shoe” I’ve been looking at a lot of photos that you’ve provided such as, Pujols, Robinson Cano, Josh Hamilton, Manny Ramirez, Ryan Braun and I see the back foot on all these guys rolling up onto the inside ball of their foot with the heel of the ground. I can’t see how the hip can make a full hard rotation without rotating onto the… Read more »

chas
Member

FK, Great question. Ok, what i’m saying is you can’t turn the laces of the shoe BEFORE you turn the hips. Turning the back foot is a false cue because you can stand up, turn your foot almost completely and your hips dont ‘have to’ move. Make sense? The abdominals and lower back pull the pelvis around in a circle around your spine. if that is done fast and explosively enough, the hip socket will lock and the leg will be pulled with the pelvis by the abdominals. I’m not saying the foot never turns…i’m saying it IS TURNED by… Read more »

FK
Guest
FK

Chas,
Thanks for the reply. Think I get it, The hip rotation should start First, the back foot turning on the ball of the foot and the heel coming off the ground we follow the hips thrusting and rotating. Basically don’t start squishing the bug before you start your hip rotation. If I’m still not getting it let me know. Thanks again.

James Richards
Member
James Richards

This took me a couple of months and many hours looking at videos to understand the difference between what turns the hips. During my eval. of Jesse I couldn’t see the difference in what was turning the hips. Now I understand that By “squishing the bug” which I tought for years, he was actually turning the hips, but not creating any power, By Loading the knee, and rotating the shoulder you are creating a rubber band effect, then with the hips rotating ahead of the shoulder the bat is brought down through the plane in a whip like motion. i… Read more »

Gary
Guest
Gary

I have been struggling with how to get my teenager to get his legs/hips more involved and correctly involved. Top half is – I think – very good. But bottom half lagging as we struggle to break him of the old “throw the hands at the ball” garbage that they taught him early on. So I love that you made your students try to get the back knee in front of the stomach and feel athletic doing it. Feeling it is everything, I can’t wait to have mine try this. Excellent!

Kwodwo Brannigan
Guest
Kwodwo Brannigan

Good day,

I live in the USVI, St. Thomas and I’m just loving all this reading and information you guys have fed me. As you mentioned above, I also am constantly searching for the secrets of hitting, how to properly teach hitting, and the learning the theories on the art. I’ve read a few books, articles, and spoken to numerous individuals, however, this is by far the best information I’ve gathered in regards to understanding, explaining, and teaching the art of hitting. Very detail stuff and FOR FREE! Keep up the good works!

jamie
Guest
jamie

chas,

Great work ! My son uses a toe tap much like Prince Fielder could use explain how the D.I.L. works with this load.

jerry
Guest

chas do you have your hitters concentrate on early wrist snap? as well as hip thrust

ed kovac
Guest

until i played pro ball, I never had a hitting lesson! I was lucky to have ted williams work with me. I found teaching the wswing is harder than hitting. I am using power chalk to telestrate students swings. We are on the same page about all i have read on ur website. a big problem is to correct bad teaching of the a to c swing in contrast to getting the bat in the path of the swing early. do you have any suggestions for that and increasing bat speed. thanks, ed

Todd
Guest
Todd

Chas –

In total agreement that attacking the ball start with the bottom half. Everyone talks about hitting against a front stiff leg. Does the front leg straighted because the back hip is firing??? My son is struggling getting off his back side (driving back hip/knee) and I want to give him a swing thought that will help drive his back side. Any ideas or drills that can help thrust his hips?

Thanks

Isaias
Guest
Isaias

Great articles, you describe everything so well in detail..
I do have one question that’s been bugging me for months though..
How can you tell the player honestly completed the turn, what do I look out for to notice a player really completes the turn?

Derek Lefebvre
Member
Derek Lefebvre

Hey Chas, really appreciate all of your blogs and videos, really good stuff! I have been trying to work on my double inside load and positive move and my hitting instructor has told me that I need to have a more controlled/slower move forward and quieter front foot. Just wondering how I can achieve the fall forward you talk about while still being under control. I also have seen the videos of AJ bumpass and he seems to have a very aggressive move forward. Does he do fine in games with his timing with that fast/aggressive move?

Blane Cannon
Member
Blane Cannon

Chas i wanted to ask how does a wide stance equal a long bat path and what do you consider a wide stance. Also i thought you wanted longer strides because in some videos your strides are pretty long and are you an advocate of the knob at the catcher ordeal. P.S. sorry for all the questions just curious.

Mikey
Guest
Mikey

Chaz
How do u feel about mike stanton and his toe tap. Love to hear what u would say about him. I’ve studied him a lot and see him using double inside load. Toe tap he uses for timing and strides forward. His head is not in center of stance but back where is his back knee is. Looking like his weight is 60/40 what do u think?

Dino Balos
Member
Dino Balos

Unable to view the 4 videos you and jk posted, thx!

JK Whited
Editor

Dvd,

Yeah those are older videos from our first YouTube account. We will check into that quickly. Thanks for the heads up!

Joe
Guest
Joe

Chaz
I know your Blackfoot should be off the ground after full rotation. I usually end up with my toes on the ground and back heel is up. What can I do to get my back foot off the ground. I have refined my swing following a lot of your techniques. Thank you!

Stephen Black
Member
Stephen Black

Joe – start by using the drive developer – if you don’t have one, get one. Don’t worry about hitting – focus on the movement. Then transfer it to T work then front toss – then… you own it. You built it – it yours. Work to be great don’t just work at it. Chas you guys are awesome, you probably know Joe but I had to put my 2 cents in. I was just watching some HS boys and girls getting instruction – unfortunately for them it was only how to create a glass ceiling in their swings –… Read more »

Jake B
Guest
Jake B

Hey Chas, Lately i have been trying to swing the bat with my core and my lower half and have been trying to not use my hands/arms much. Lately i have been getting jammed a lot and i almost feel like my hands are staying too far back for too long and that i am not using my arms enough.. I have also heard you talk about the shoulders and arms being married to each other. If i use my lower half and core properly to swing the bat will that Force my hands to stay connected to my shoulders?… Read more »

Travis K.
Guest
Travis K.

I have a question regarding some of the photos above. If you look at the pictures of Chas above, in the third picture he is at the start of the hip turn, but I noticed that the front foot is barely open. I am wondering why that is the case if what you are teaching is an open foot at landing? I don’t mean to sound rude either, but is there something I am missing?

Jay
Guest
Jay

Chas, I have a question about the back leg. My son’s Epstein hitting instructor claims that the back knee should drive toward the front knee during the turn. Epstein actually has two drills (the wall drill and the carpet drill) to teach this movement). I have also read elsewhere that the rear knee drives both forward and downward which helps with the hinge or tilt. My question is simple: Is the rear knee a “mover” in the sense that the hitter “moves” it forward or, like the back foot, is the rear knee simply along for the ride when the… Read more »

Brian
Guest
Brian

Chas,

Enjoyed the article. Very well written and it is a shame that this isn’t implemented regularly across the board. Would you agree that this is like a pitcher to some degree at release where they have not released that back leg to come through?

Good stuff man. Keep it coming.

Brian

Darryl Wilson
Guest
Darryl Wilson

I really enjoy reading your articles. I coach my son’s league, all-star, and travel ball teams and have used and learned a lot of new information that was not given to me when I was a player. Thanks for all of the helpful information.

Noah
Guest
Noah

Do you do any camps over the summer