Posted on

The Movements that Made The Rebellion – The Rebel’s Rack Revisited

As Baseball Rebellion/Softball Rebellion has grown, we have decided to be more open with the “HOW” of our process instead of just the results.  This, for years, was not the case at BR/SR, as we wouldn’t even let clients film the movement progressions we do with hitters.  We are all excited about how showing these movements can help players of all ages turn faster and hit with more power.  Releasing our movement progression has been something I’ve considered for a long time.  We haven’t done it, until now, and will be including an even more detailed breakdown inside of the Rebel’s Rack Drills for those who have and are going to purchase the Rebel’s Rack.  All in all, the movement progressions we are about to show you have built what we do here at BR/SR.  Without them, the Hittrax data we produce, the scholarships, draft picks/bonus money, and the opportunities for our position player athletes would be greatly diminished.  We at Baseball Rebellion are extremely excited to show our process and continue to push ourselves to be more transparent and give more back to the game that have given us so much.  Enjoy!

On May 29th, 2012, I launched the Rebel’s Rack, a rotational power trainer and ‘hitting aid’ that helps baseball and softball players hit the ball harder and farther.  At the time, Baseball Rebellion had no Hittrax machines, so all we had was a stalker gun we held up at the hitter to test their exit velocities.  Softball and baseball players of all ages and ability levels were radically increasing their ball exit speed in matters of minutes using our movement progressions and the Rebel’s Rack.  

Over 55 Rebel’s Racks being shipped!

Over the years, the Rebel’s Rack has changed some.  No longer yellow in color, the Rebel’s Rack now has 4 sizes that fit kids as small as 50 lbs up to 250lbs.  The ‘wings’ on the Rebel’s Rack are longer now, limiting any pinching that the first iteration of the Rebel’s Rack could cause.  More importantly, how we USE the rack has changed, as we’ve learned the nuances of training rotation and preparing to rotate and timing that rotation to a moving ball.  At the time, I had no idea how much I’d grow to love training movement and improving rotational range, speed, and power.  The first lessons with the Rebel’s Rack, the ‘non-hitting’ lessons, are my most favorite to teach.  The foundation of movement quality and speed built there translates into game acceleration, adjustability, speed and power almost immediately for most players.  Watching a player find out what ‘FASTEST’ really is inside of their bodies and inside of their turn/swing for the first time and their eye’s light up and the green numbers flash on the Hittrax is what I love most about my job.  The Green Bell has been a great culture builder, pushing players to want to come out of their comfort zones to get the applause of those in the building when they ring the bell after a new personal record.

BUT HOW do we as instructors help players, even pros, generate so much more distance and exit velocity so fast?  Over the past 5 years, through trial and error, painstaking video analysis, and constant exit velocity and distance monitoring, the team of instructors at Baseball Rebellion have created the Rebel’s Rack Movement Progression. Below, you will see the three (3) main moves we use, and make hitters MASTER before they are allowed to hit (in the cage) again in our program.  These foundational moves are practiced over and over, deliberately, with internal cues that the hitter must make on their own before he or she re-earns the right to hit.  

 

Movement One: The Stride (Tempo Based, Slowing the Game Down)

Once any hitter returns for their first ‘lesson’ after the evaluation they don’t even need their bat.  We head over to a mirror and the hitter is instructed to stride ‘at the mirror’ as if the mirror were the pitcher.  I want the hitter to see themselves move and hear our cues.  “The mirror is the best teacher in the building” is often said at BR/SR.  Another favorite is, “your eyes are for the mirror, your ears are for me”.  The hitter, strides and strides and strides.  Over and over.  All while watching themselves stride in the mirror and reacting and evolving their movements based on the cues and instructions of the BR Instructor.

Keys to the Stride:

  • Extremely Slow in the landing
  • Open front foot/kneecap towards the mirror (pitcher)
  • Heel to Heel Landing position
  • No opening or ‘flinching’ of the chest at landing
  • Head BACK over Back Hip (this is a change from what we taught years ago, as hitting is more than just generating rotational power…you have to be able to hit and lift a moving ball)
  • Once these keys are achieved, we move on to the Rebel’s Rack Movement Progression to Movement Two. 

Movement Two: The Show (Preparing to Turn, Storing Energy)

Now, the hitter has mastered the slow stride (this can be a leg kick, small lift, toe tap, pretty much anything the hitter wants) with an open front leg/kneecap towards the mirror.  The hitter’s head is back and he or she is not ‘flinching’ or opening their shoulders at any point in the movement or at landing on the front foot.  The hitter has earned the right to progress into the “Show” phase of the Rebel’s Rack Movement Progression.  Still in the mirror, facing the mirror as if it were the pitcher, the hitter is instructed to stride exactly as they did before with a few simple, and extremely important changes.  As the hitter lands, they are instructed to open their pelvis towards the mirror as they keep their front shoulder closed.  Cues we use range from “show your belly button towards the pitcher” to “open your stomach as far as you can while you show the back ‘wing’ of the Rebel’s Rack in the mirror”.  Essentially, we are twisting up the body in opposite ways.  The lower half is opening, and the upper half, specifically the upper back and back arm, are resisting that opening as hard as they can.  This stores energy and prepares the body to TURN as quickly as possible.  EVERY SINGLE THING done in “the Show” phase is preparing the body to turn quickly and instantly.  Store as much energy as possible and completely wind yourself up as far as you can without losing sight of the pitcher with your back eye.

Keys to the Show:

  • Open the pelvis from ABOVE the pelvis, using your lower back and stomach muscles.
  • Soft and slow landing with the front side, no ‘bouncing’ into the ground or ‘stomping’.
  • Keep your front shoulder totally still or ‘slightly close’ your front side shoulder by pulling back with your upper back and resist the opening/turn/swing with your back arm/upper back.

Movement Three:  The Turn

Now the hitter has mastered the MOVEMENTS of slowly striding and slowly storing up as much energy for the turn as possible.  It’s time to put that energy to good use!  The hitter goes into the “Show” phase of the turn move and lands and stops.  From here, we teach the hitter the turn, from a dead standstill.  Basically, the turn is three basic movements that happen all at once.

The hitter must SIMULTANEOUSLY pull their back hip forward from above the pelvis (this moves the back foot as well), forcefully straighten their front leg into the ground through the front heel of the front foot, and turn their belly button past the pitcher and back shoulder all the way to centerfield.  Usually, there are many different mistakes that happen, and almost ALL of them are caused by the hitter turning too slowly.  Remember, the turn must be LEARNED FAST while the preparation to turn must be learned and executed slowly.    The faster you turn…the faster you learn!  Slowness in the turn causes the hitter’s head to drift forward, the front leg to fail to straighten out, the back foot/hip not moving forward far enough or too far (both can happen) and the shoulders not to turn all the way.  Many balance issues arise when the turn is slow…and the hitter MUST be totally committed to the idea of achieving maximum speed in the turn from the beginning to the finish.  There is no slowing down…no easing into it…the turn must GO and be done.  

Keys to the Turn:

  • The hitter must turn as fast and completely as possible, there is no ‘almost’ or ‘kinda fast’
  • The hitter must lock out his front knee completely and hold the finish
  • The hitter must pull the back foot forward with no dragging of the toe
  • The hitter must land on the ball of their back foot and not let the heel drop
  • The hitter’s back knee must be in front of the hitter’s face at the finish of the turn (swingman finish)
  • The back shoulder must completely replace the front shoulder and be higher than the front shoulder at the finish

 

If a hitter is willing to spend the time mastering this movement progression with these executable internal cues, then the ‘chaos’ of hitting gets much much easier to deal with.  Problems like a change of velocity or break are more easily solved by ‘sinking into’ the front side.  Remember, we learned the turn from a dead stop position (Show Position), so now the hitter knows he or she can go fast from there.  If a hitter gets fooled, they have a better plan…and it’s built in.  Mr. Miyagi did this to Daniel Son by having him Wax on, Wax off and Paint the Fence.  These repeatable actions became ingrained in him so when Miyagi attacked Daniel, he knew how to defend the different punches.    Likewise, hitter’s posture and turn aggression become what we call ‘unbreakable’.  The “unbreakable” posture and turn speed can be practiced daily and once these movements are mastered, they become subconscious and are instantly recalled by the body when needed in games.  In minutes, a hitter can do hundreds of turns with the rack without any failure at all!  Imagine how efficient your training could be if you took away the stress of hitting?  No more frustrated faces from a rollover or a pop up…No more hitting until your hands bleed…no more confusion about WHY you went 0 – 4…you’ll know why you failed…your posture and speed of the turn broke.  The less a hitter ‘breaks’ within the game turn, the better he or she will hit.  Period.  

Training movements away from the cage and then taking them into the cage is common in instruction nowadays.  But much of that training and ‘feel work’ doesn’t translate and is just feels for feels sake.  We want everything a hitter does to increase their ability to accelerate their turn, time their turn, and find their top speed as fast as they can with their BODY, not with their arms and hands.  We even take the Rebel’s Rack into the cages at first, before they hit, so they can time a moving ball with their turn after they time their load with the pitcher’s arm swing or windup.  This sequence leads to the fastest improvements we have ever seen on Hittrax, the fastest ‘ah ha’ moments for our clients, the most confidence in our shared process, and the fastest carry over into games.  

Writing this article and posting these videos was scary for me.  I’ve had many, many people tell me ‘they just don’t understand what you guys do’ when people come at us on social media.  Players we’ve helped say, ‘Chas, if they knew how fast you and the guys did it, and how you guys did it, then they’d understand’.  For years we have hidden this information from ‘outsiders’.  Now, we at Baseball Rebellion and Softball Rebellion are going to bring you behind the curtain and you can try to duplicate our results for yourself.  Get some Racks, and learn how to turn.  Enjoy the success this will bring you, your team, and or your players.  The Rebel’s Rack Movement Progression is a secret no more, now let’s unlock whats inside your body already…the fastest turns you’ve ever experienced!  

 

The Rebel’s Rack

$74.99

The Rebel’s Rack is the best hitting trainer for rotational hitting. The Rebel’s Rack helps to increase your player’s power, bat speed, and line drive hitting consistency.

Clear

SKU: rebels-rack Categories: ,

Description

The Rebel’s Rack is the most efficient way to develop rotational power within the baseball and softball swing.  Made of metal and powder coated, the Rebel’s Rack is almost indestructible.  Custom drills for the rebel’s rack that include range of motion, power and speed work, and isometrics are included at purchase and instantly accessible through your mobile phone, tablet or computer.  The Rebel’s Rack is used by dozens of professional players, NCAA teams, and high schools all over the country.  Easily fits inside a bat bag a perfect way to time pitchers in the on deck circle or practice timing and pitch tracking in bullpen sessions.  Perfect for injured players who cannot old a bat, now that player can ‘learn to turn’ as they come back to playing.

Team Orders

 

For team orders please call Baseball Rebellion to receive a product quote: 919-309-0040

 

Features

  • Promotes proper swing path & rotational hitting for baseball and softball
  • Increases power & line drive hitting consistency
  • Creates more power, harder hits, & more bat speed
  • Use the Rebel’s Rack by itself or with resistance from bands or cable machines
  • Comes with Step-by-Step How-To Guide and Drill Videos
  • 6-month guarantee against manufacturing defects
  • Hand-made in the United States and tested before shipping

Size Chart

Player T-Shirt Size Rebel’s Rack Size
YS-YL Extra Small
YXL – Small Small
Medium – Large Medium
XL-XXL Large

Chas Pippitt, Leader of the Baseball and Softball Rebellion

Posted on

FREE DRILL GIVEAWAY! Arm Swing Separation Drill With Band Resistance

#ThirtySecondLesson

This past week I tweeted a quick drill without going too far in depth into why we do the drill and what it is for. I use this drill for pitchers and position players of all ages every day in my lessons. It works so well that I wanted to share it with all our readers in hopes that it will make your (or your son/daughter’s) delivery safer and more effective. Hope you enjoy!

Drill Part 1: The Arm Swing

In the video below I explain the first of three phases of the Band Separation Drill. A good arm swing starts right out of the glove. It is involved with the first initial movement of the lower half momentum. As the lower half drives toward the target, the throwing arm should be relaxed out of the glove.

The reason I use the band is to allow my brain and body to work together.  Use the tension of the band to allow the body to do most of the work. You do not necessarily want to PULL the band into position.

 

The Flaw

The reason for a more consistent arm swing, and why we want to integrate a proper sequence of movements, is to maintain a healthy and effective delivery. We want to avoid teaching cues like show the ball to center fielder and point the glove to the target because these cues make the player’s hands break away from each other which leads to unhealthy and uneffective timing flaws. For example, pitchers that have these tend to have their head/trunk very forward too early in the delivery.

The photos above are of Carter Capps pitching for the Marlins before he was traded to the San Diego Padres. Capps received Tommy John Surgery in March of 2015 and needed surgery for Thoracic Outlet Syndrome this offseason. They hope he will be back for 2108 spring training but he is a huge question mark for a return to full health. Capps was one of the most promising young pitchers of the game at one point but poor mechanics have hurt him. WHY?  You can see above that he points his glove right to the target and tries to hide the ball on his backside. There is no arm swing involved with this delivery. He also does a crazy leap forward off of the mound, which puts him in a very bad spot at foot strike. His elbow is above his shoulder with his upper body forward over his belt. This type of delivery is bad because he never allows his posture to change to continue his shoulders to rotate properly toward the target. The next part of the drill goes into how proper posture change leads to an efficient position at front foot strike.

Drill Part 2: Shoulder Separation with Posture Change

 

Drill Part 3: Rotation into Ball Release

 

 

40 Minute Fix

Please comment below, email me dave@baseballrebellion.com, or tweet @Dshinbone15 or @BRrebellion with any questions about this drill!

Want the bands that Dave is using in this drill?  Check out our store to purchase the bands!

 

Posted on

BR Client Adam Parzych Wins the 2017 National Power Showcase!

Hey everyone!  In this article I’m going to recap an amazing weekend I had in Dallas, TX watching the 2017 National Power Showcase at Globe Life Park in Arlington which ended in a win for one of my very first Baseball Rebellion clients here in Tallahassee, Florida. The whole weekend was awesome! Brian Domenico, the president of the Power Showcase, does an amazing job of running this event year in and year out. The Power Showcase and International Power Showcases are two home run derbies run yearly (one in Texas and one in Florida) that feature some of the countries best young Power hitting talents. I’ll be honest, I was absolutely impressed by how much power some of these young kids had. I witnessed 14-year-old go 504 feet over the Hyundai sign in left-center field and numerous other 14U and 13U kids hit balls 400+. Truly fun to watch!

With all that being said, I want the aim of this article to be focused on the 14U winner Adam Parzych. 2 months ago, I moved to Tallahassee to run a remote site for Baseball Rebellion. One of the very first clients I had was Adam Parzych. His dad, Jeff, told me they were interested in training for the two Power Showcases at the end of this year. I thought, “How cool!” Adam and I sat down and talked about his goals during Adams swing evaluation. Adam wanted to train to win these events. With that in mind, we went to work.

Two times a week for the past two months Adam and I worked on constructing a plan for this event. According to our HitTrax, Adam struggled early consistently getting the ball high in the air. His average launch angle was 16, his max distance was 313 feet, and his max exit velocity 87.4.

For some context, for Adam’s age group at the Power Showcase, contestants get 15 outs to hit as many home runs as they can. Any ball hit over 300 feet down the lines and 325 to Center would be considered a home run. We trained with one goal in mind: hit the ball high. Adam would need to get his launch angle to at least the upper 20s to get the distance he would need to have a chance winning the event. 

In the beginning of Adams training, hitting the ball hard and high was a very difficult task for him. It took a lot of time in the mirror working on different movements to make these swing changes occur. We did a lot of work with the dowel stick. Trying to get his upper body to work more like a Ferris wheel as opposed to a merry go round. After a few weeks, Adam started to drive the ball higher more often. Around the 5th week, Adam shot up to 361 feet on his max distance and 93 mph on his max exit velocity. At the time he did this, he was 13 years old. Funny thing is he was only behind one other 13-year-old in the country at this time for max distance. The 13-year-old who was ahead of Adam is current Baseball Rebellion client CJ Powell out of Lincolnton, NC.

“This kid is going to smash everyone at this event” was my thought at that time. We then hit a 2-week stretch where Adam didn’t hit 1 ball over 330. “Hmm”, I thought, “What happened?” The problem was, which is common in hitters of all ages after seeing some power success, Adam was trying to falsely generate power in his swing. Adam was trying to recruit force in smaller joints in the body out of sequence. Adam was overriding his lower body and his arms were taking over his swing way too early. I see this all too often when hitters try and go for more in their swings. As a result of all of this, his exit velocity and distance numbers plummeted.

One lesson he came in and he had just had a basketball practice. Adam told me he was tired. Completely fine and I believed him because Adam is a great kid and works extremely hard. I told him, “Ok, let’s just go about 75% today.” I did not know this at the time, but that was the single most important swing cue I gave Adam (after going through our movement progression) in his preparation for this event. He almost immediately started consistently hitting balls 320+ with ease. I was like, “Dude, how are you doing this?” He told me, “Thinking 75% keeps me loose and makes me load longer. If I try and swing as hard as I can, I don’t really get the most of my load.” Talk about an extremely advanced swing thought for a 14-year-old. I told him, “I could not agree anymore. 75% it is.” Adam had made the swing change he needed to be successful in this event. He didn’t need to “go for more”, Adam needed to relax his mind and his body to stay loose throughout his swing.

It was quite the moment for me as a hitting instructor. 95% of the time I can’t get younger hitters, and even some older hitters, to swing hard enough. Here I found myself actually telling a kid to not go as fast as he could and it led to a successful outcome in his swing. I could go off on a huge tangent about where to go fast in the swing but I’ll save that for another article. 75% was Adams sweet spot for consistency. So the plan for the event was to miss high in the air and work at about a 75% effort capacity. Here is a look at Adams last lesson Hittrax report before leaving for the Power Showcase.

So, last weekend, it was off to Dallas I went. The setting for the Power Showcase was very cool. As I stated earlier in the article, Brian Domenico does an outstanding job of getting some exceptionally talented young players to come to this event. Getting the opportunity to compete in a national home run derby on a big league field looks like quite the experience. Globe Life Park is a beautiful venue for this event.

I worked with Adam off-site right before the event. We went over the plan again. Adam looked ready. Pretty much every ball he hit in our session was high off the top of the cage. Just as I said numerous times before in the two months prior, I told him again, “If you hit like that, you will win.”

Adam’s 1st round at the event was spectacular. He hit 12 home runs in the 1st round which put him in a two-way tie for 1st place. He also hit 6 in a row that round. We talked after and he told me that all he was trying to do was miss high in the air. This is a great thought for an event like this because it all but eliminates the chance of hitting groundballs. I was extremely proud of how Adam stuck to the plan and executed it.

Adams 2nd round was interesting. He only had 1 home run with 8 outs. He appeared to be a little high on the ball during this time. Meaning he was hitting a lot of low line drives and groundballs. One of the things we worked on during training was a plan if this were to happen. One of the easiest adjustments a hitter can make to hit the ball higher is to just aim lower on the ball. We practiced that because I was certain it would happen at some point in the event and Adam ended up hitting 9 home runs total in his championship round. I would have been proud of Adam regardless of the outcome of the event but I was most proud of how he didn’t get frustrated, he stuck to the plan, and he ended up with a pretty solid final round home run total. I shook his hand said I was proud of him and we eagerly awaited the last participant to hit. Before the last kid hit, I could tell Adam was a little upset. I told him he had nothing to be upset about and 9 might be enough to win it. The last participant came to bat and ended up with just 1 home run in his round. Adam had won the event! I gave him a handshake and a hug and told him I was so proud of him for all his hard work the past two months. Here is a video of Adams home runs in his final round.

I was very excited to write this article because winning this event is exactly what we had set out for 2 months ago when I moved here and started working with Adam. I told him to enjoy this moment and that it was his ability to execute the plan which won him the event. I’m extremely happy for Adam and happy to share this story through Baseball Rebellion. Look out for Adam at the International Power Showcase in Miami, Florida at the end of this year!

Posted on

The MEW Drill to Help a Thrower’s Arm Path

A clean and consistent “Arm-Swing” is crucial to the health and longevity of any thrower.  Through hours of video analysis, studying various drills, and looking at various patterns the best pitchers of all time we have determined the most efficient arm swing happens when the throwing hand falls out of the glove staying relaxed into the arm swing.

Maintaining the highest level of consistency throughout a pitchers career is the biggest part of being able to repeat a healthy delivery. One of the vital components the Baseball Rebellion throwing program is to make each individual excellent at playing a simple game catch.  If you can become consistent throwing a baseball within your individual throwing program, there is no reason you shouldn’t be consistent off the mound.   We can become better throwers instantly once we understand the value of repeating our arm action and understand how the arm works.

One of the most valuable components of our program is teaching a student to build a consistently repeatable arm swing in their delivery. The arm swing is the path a pitcher’s hand or arm takes as he brings the ball out of his glove and eventually into the acceleration of the throw. Characteristics of a well-executed arm swing are, how the arm extends out of the glove as one piece. This is properly done when performing the M part of the drill. The arm should stay relaxed with no added tension or stress as it moves through the throw. Your hand will extend upwards into a rotation. Towards 3B for RHP and towards 1B for LHP into the E phase of the drill. The arm swing matches the momentum of the body. The arm should rotate with the shoulders to provide and consistent ball release which is the W part of the drill. The arm swing can be long or short but it has to match the movement of the lower half.

The concept of the MEW drill is simple and effective to all throwers. It is done in the mirror using a Wilson tennis racket.  Follow the steps and start to complete a more efficient and healthy arm action. I hope you enjoy the drill video below and the examples of both youth and professional throwers emulating this technique.

              M                                  E                                W

(Throw was after doing the MEW Drill with racquet)

 

              M                                E                                  W

 

Dave Shinskie, Leader of Pitching Rebellion

Posted on

Vision Training and Mental Training: Baseball Rebellion and Softball Rebellion’s NEWEST Advantage for Your Player

I first met Mike Halpert about a little over a year ago.  He was working with some pitchers in my facility and doing some breathing techniques with them that, at the time, I thought were garbage.  I had no experience with mental training, and certainly, no ‘breath work’ had happened in my preparation for my own baseball career or athletes that I trained.  After about 3 weeks, I asked Mike a question that probably sounded like this…

…Because I certainly couldn’t figure it out.

Most people, when faced with that type of question, would have gotten defensive, but Mike Halpert of Capacity Training did not.  He simply responded, “let me show you”.

Skeptically, I let Mike set up his stuff in my office and I started with his vision training.  I did it, and I was surprised that it was kind of hard…I couldn’t ‘see’ the splotch that was supposed to ‘appear’ (think Magic Eye book appear), and I couldn’t see any ‘dots by the diamonds’.  Clearly…this training was junk…

Then, Mike grabbed my left hand and hooked up a ‘clapping device’ to my palm and had me clap to the ‘beat’ of some sort of timer. I was confused as to how this worked and why it worked and my scores were not good at all.  I was early all the time and I was sweating as I simply stood there…and clapped.  We talked about the anxiety the ‘bad’ or ‘red’ claps were and how satisfying the ‘good’ or ‘green’ claps were.  Then we did some breathing exercise which, honestly, I thought was a waste of time.

Mike asked me what I thought…and I said I wasn’t sure…but I’d try again tomorrow.

The next day, Mike helped me understand “the WHY” behind the breathing and clapping.  I improved tremendously in all aspects of his training in one day!  I was more on time, my heart rate was lower, I didn’t sweat profusely when clapping…which was good.  I proceeded to train with Mike Halpert at Capacity Training every day for the next 28 days.  My progress was amazing.

My wife noticed I was more organized, helpful around the house, and calmer with my 2 and a half-year-old son, Bryant, when he did ridiculously stupid 2 and half-year-old things.  From a business perspective, I turned around my online lessons faster, and made clearer decisions on the direction Baseball Rebellion would head.   I loved the timing training and the vision training helped me combat the damage of constantly looking at the computer doing video analysis.  Capacity Training works…and I had to get my athletes working with Mike’s program as fast as I could.  Their results on the field have been impressive, to say the least.  Here are just a few of their comments about Mike and the Capacity Training Program:

Mike wanted to let you know that since starting Capacity Training approximately one year ago I have noticed some key changes in Joe’s hitting as well as his pitching and field play. Basically, he is able to “slow the game down” in high leverage situations and execute on a consistent basis in these critical moments.  When hitting he is able to handle two strike counts much better…and recorded his first varsity home run this year, a grand slam, on a 3-2 count, down 1 run to the 2016 State Champion runner-up team with their D-1 pitching commit on the mound. He used the techniques learned from Capacity Training to calm himself and barrel up an 88+ MPH fastball and drive it out of the park 350+ feet for a Grand Slam. I firmly believe that he would not have been able to make that happen without the Capacity Training techniques he has learned.  Additionally, he has become very calm on the mound…He is not rattled with difficult counts. He just leans on his Capacity Training, calms himself, and executes his pitches.  He owes this significant playing time as a sophomore to his hard work and the skills that Capacity Training has taught him.  –  Joe Barrow Sr. Raleigh, NC

Since starting Capacity Training (CT) with Mike,  just over two months ago, my 9 yr old son has benefitted with much better focus, timing and improved vision.  The vision training has helped to eliminate headaches as he has gained much-needed strength in his vision.    The CT sessions have built a sense of confidence and do away with unneeded distractions. Like many other kids his age, he has had a tendency to fidget when asked to perform certain tasks.    The CT has greatly reduced those distractions and we have seen improvements in his school work and Athletic performances.  In school, he would, occasionally, miss questions because of lack of focus, but over the past few weeks, his work has been near perfect.  Athletically he has less anxiety resulting in more confidence and expectation of success.”  –  Chase Riggs, WV

“We do Capacity Training’s vision training to enhance our ability to recognize pitches and the spin on the ball.  My players say it helps them recognize velocity sooner, which in turn allows them to make a better swing decision.  Capacity Training’s vision training has also helped our outfielders with tracking batted balls” Aileen Morales, Head Softball coach Georgia Tech University Softball

“There are no words for how excited I am about working with Capacity Training.  I started the vision program this summer to see if it would be something useful for our program and I was blown away.  My results have been remarkable.  I’m excited to see the same positive results I experience personally impact our team.”  –  Yolanda McRae, Hitting Coach Arkansas Softball

The best part about Capacity Training is that, like the online lessons, no matter where you live you can get the best training that Capacity Training and Mike Halpert has to offer right in your own home!  The vision training program he offers works exactly on the skills baseball/softball players need to be great hitters or defenders.  Skills like depth perception, ball tracking, pitch speed and location recognition, and holding your visual focus are all parts of his vision training and timing training program.  You will learn the skills to get into your “zone” and stay there throughout entire at bats, games and tournaments.  I cannot give Mike and Capacity Training a higher endorsement.  Please look into their awesome programming and find out the visual and mental edge that you can gain with this protocol.

 

 

Chas Pippitt, Leader of the Baseball Rebellion

 

Posted on

End Late Swings and Foul Balls – Bat Drag & the Bat Drag Buster!

As mentioned in the video above, bat drag is when a batter will pull their back elbow past the knob of the bat, delaying the barrel’s turn around the knob.  Therefore the barrel is being “dragged” behind the knob for a majority of the hitters swing, only to be turned or whipped out from behind at the last second.  Often times, this last second barrel turn will result in extremely inconsistent contact.  However, if the timing is perfect, hard contact can be had but is not sustainable as a player rises to competition level.

Once bat drag is identified as the main problem, the player must first learn how to use their lower half properly.  When a player has bat drag, their upper half is being used as the main driver for bat speed.  Learning the proper lower half techniques will help the player feel where power really starts from.

After or during a player’s lower half “renovation”, they can start to progress up the swing and really dive into fixing their bat drag.  Some players that are older or coordinated enough can begin to work on it sooner if they can handle it.  The Bat Drag Buster can really help a player feel the space between the elbows needed through their rotation.  With the bat drag buster on and a series of drill provided by the Baseball/Softball Rebellion, players can learn to also turn their barrels deeper and faster into the hitting zone and therefore eliminate their “drag”.

Thanks for reading!

JK Whited – Senior Hitting Instructor

 

 

 

Posted on

Baseball Rebellion Online Lessons Moved to Hudl Technique!

Baseball Rebellion Switching to Hudl Technique

I want to begin this post by sincerely thanking all of you who read our content, watch our videos, consult us for online lessons, and use our products. The feedback and support you have given us has been priceless and you and the reason that we constantly look for ways to improve the material we offer you. The latest improvement at Baseball Rebellion has come in the form of our online lessons. We have moved our online platform from the aging PowerChalk to HUDL Technique.

Hudl Technique allows for the easiest possible process of taking, uploading, and sharing video with a Baseball Rebellion hitting or pitching instructor through your Android or Apple device mobile or tablet device. Below, I will show you how easy this process truly is.

1. Download Hudl Technique App to Mobile Device

Hudl Technique

2. Sign Up as a Player (If You Do Not Already Have a Hudl Technique Account)

Hudl Technique

Simply enter your name, email, password, and select either Baseball or Softball.

2. Log In

Hudl Technique

Enter the email and password you used in Step 2.

3. Press Team Button on Side of Screen and Add Instructor

Hudl Technique

Press team button on side of screen ,then press “+” symbol on top right of screen. Select “Find on Hudl Technique” and enter your instructor’s email address. Below are the emails for Baseball Rebellion online instructors. Ideally, your instructor will be the only Hudl user on your team.

Gabe Dimock (Hitting): gabe@baseballrebellion.com

JK Whited (Hitting): jk@baseballrebellion.com

KC Judge (Hitting): kc@baseballrebellion.com

Tyler Zupcic (Hitting): tyler@baseballrebellion.com

Dave Shinske (Baseball Pitching): dave@baseballrebellion.com

Kara Willis (Softball Pitching): kara@softballrebellion.com

4. Record or Import Video in Hudl Technique

Hudl Technique

Press record button on side of screen and take desired video or import videos from your device. When finished press “Done”.

5. Tag Video and Share With Baseball Rebellion Instructor

Hudl Technique

Hudl Technique

On this screen, you will select “hitting” or “pitching” as the technique, tag yourself (labeled “Me”) in the video and share with your team. You may also leave comments for your instructor at the top of this screen.

6. Leave App Open Until Video Shares Completely

Hudl Technique

If the app is closed before upload finishes, your instructor will not receive the video.

As you can see from these easy steps, The Hudl Technique app is extremely user-friendly.

Instructor Feedback

Our instructor feedback is the best in the industry with a great turn around time of only three business days. The feedback given is in depth but easy to understand. Next steps and recommended drills are always provided at the end of each lesson. In order to give you an idea for what an online lesson looks like with each Baseball Rebellion instructor, below are video examples.

Gabe Dimock

JK Whited

KC Judge

Tyler Zupcic

Dave Shinskie

Online Lesson Packages

Our online lesson packages come in four possible packages:

Gold: Unlimited video per month ($159/month)

Silver: 6 videos per month ($119/month)

Bronze: 3 videos per month ($79/month

1 Time Hitting Analysis: 1 video ($40)

Click here to view the full online lesson page!

Thank you for reading and we look forward to helping you build your swing through Hudl Technique!

Gabe Dimock – Baseball Rebellion Hitting Instructor

 

Posted on

It’s all in the Hips! The BEST Hip Activation Drill for Throwers

This is a drill that helps activate the hips and create awareness of how to use your lower half into a throw.  Some kids have trouble with the movement shown in this video. Simply learning how to properly rotate your hips into a throw will help promote natural velocity gains.

The rear hip generates force toward the target which should open up the front side. I see kids struggle with this drill when trying to increase speed, so start off slow. Make sure you pay attention to not letting your upper half fly open when rotating the hips toward the target.

This is a three part drill. When done correctly this drill can increase hip mobility and create better separation when front foot lands. Baseball Rebellion promotes front foot heel landing so the glute can fire instantly to allow a proper brace up of the front leg, which will create more velocity on your throws by allow your hips to clear. Increase the intensity of the drill as you feel more comfortable with the movements to maximize arm speed.

I hope this drill helps activate your hips and teaches you how to properly rotate the lower half through a throw. Try it out, comment below with any questions or thoughts on the Hip Activation Drill.

Posted on

Baseball Rebellion Pitching Breakdown: Masahiro Tanaka

Baseball Rebellion Pitching Breakdown

Masahiro Tanaka

Masahiro Tanaka is struggling in his last 4 starts of the 2017 season. Baseball Rebellion breaks down his pitching mechanics and gives insight on Tanaka’s troubles.  He throws a four and two-seam fastball, slider, curveball, and a nasty split-finger. Tanaka was an All-Star his first Major League season in 2014. Much of his success has come from throwing low is the zone and mixing up his fastball and off speed. He is having to throw more fastballs this year and he is leaving balls up and over the plate. In this breakdown, I mention that these balls left over the plate can be due to a lack of efficiency with his hips and his front leg bracing up. Split-finger fastballs put tremendous stress on the elbow when thrown. This can also be a case of having to throw more fastballs because of his partially torn UCL that was never repaired. Either way, Masahiro has a few things to fix mechanically or he will continue to struggle. Thanks for watching this week’s pitching breakdown.

If you are interested in having your swing broke down by Dave, click here!

Posted on

How To Stop Kids From Throwing Sidearm

The most common problem I see in both online and in person evaluations is a lack of body awareness through the throwing delivery. Many kids are seemingly taught to just lift their leg and then throw. There is a gap in instruction on how the lower and upper body should properly be used together. These teaching patterns persist for one reason; parents and coaches were never taught proper throwing mechanics themselves.

Why Do Kids Throw Sidearm?

The number one reason why kids throw sidearm is their shoulder rotation is on a horizontal plane instead of a directional plane toward the target. Horizontal rotation happens because young throwers are trying to hit a target by simply aiming and, by doing so, stop the rotation of their shoulders and trunk. The arms follow the path of the shoulders toward the target causing the throwing arm to move away from target while struggling to maintain a consistent arm path.

Fixing The Pattern

The quickest way to transform a poor throwing motion is to gain control of upper body movements. Additionally, the more the player embraces the difference in the feeling of how to control their arms together the faster the changes happen. When teaching repeatable movements I focus on the player using more of his or her body to propel the arm forward. We train the player to allow their arms to move around the head and instead of letting their shoulders fly open. Teaching players to allow their body body to move purposefully significantly increases accuracy and velocity.

Nathan G. Before

These videos are about a year and half apart. The video above is of 10 year Nathan G. throwing sidearm from 46ft. Nathan is now 12 years old and pitches from 50 and 60ft. The movement changes we made with both his lower half and Directional Rotational are clear in the video below. He now has the confidence to be the player we knew he can be thanks to his hard work.

Nathan G. After

Drills To Help Directional Rotation

A better timing pattern of movements is the key to having and efficient and fluid delivery. Flying open with the front side is usually related to a delayed trigger. A common reason associated with a delayed trigger is “Sitting Into The Back Leg.” This does not allow the body to be properly synced from the start. A proper back leg drive starts the chain of better movements. Keeping your shoulders closed, through the initial drive and into front foot strike, will help create a more repeatable throwing motion. This also creates a “rubber band” effect in the body that is called Hips to Shoulder Separation.

This is the position evident in all hard throwers when their front foot hits the ground. Training the brain to work with the body in order to hold on to this feeling until the shoulders are ready to release is another key factor in avoiding throwing sidearm. Staying committed to a constant flow of energy from lower half drive into proper shoulder and truck rotation, while  staying connected to the mound, can be learned with proper repetition. At Baseball Rebellion, we have a variety of drills to help throwers learn how to feel this movement. Below are few basic and effective drills to introduce consistent positive movement dynamics.

Focus is the Key

The best part about learning these patterns is they do not have to be done with a ball. Starting out by learning to concentrate on repeating the throwing motion, by using more core strength, will create a more whip-like in the arm allowing the player to stay strong through the entire motion. Focus is key when trying to feel the changes happening in your delivery. The younger you can start a player working these drills with tempo and consistency, the more it will pay off in the long run. I hope you enjoyed my article, thank you for reading. Please leave your comments below.

Dave Shinskie – Baseball Rebellion Head Pitching Instructor


*Join the Rebellion Today $40 / 1 time pitching/throwing analysisBaseball Rebellion Delivery Analysis

Sign up today to see and hear Dave’s breakdown of your baseball players pitching delivery with a 1-time delivery analysis. If you like your pitching analysis you can sign up for one of our Online Pitching Memberships
1) Evaluation* – Your mechanics fully explained and areas needing improvement.
2) Receive a Baseball Rebellion Drill – We give you one of our player specific drills to ensure improvement in the right areas and to start your process.