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Hit More Line Drives Without Changing Your Swing

Written By: Eric Tyler

Hit More Line Drives Without Changing Your Swing

Contact point. Where the bat meets the ball. It can be argued that this position is the most vital to any baseball swing. Hitters may get there differently but the majority of the greats share the same positioning at contact. But just as important as how our body is aligned at this point is where the ball is in conjunction with our body at contact. How deep or far in front of us the ball is, can dictate the quality of contact. 

One sport where contact point is emphasized is golf. With a stationary ball, they are able to force a contact point by where they address the ball. Let’s take a look at what we can learn from the golf swing when pertaining to contact points. 

How Far Out In Front Should a Hitter Make Contact?

What Is a Contact Point?

Thousandths of a second. That is how long the ball stays on the bat at contact. Everything we do as a hitter is to set up for those thousandths of a second. How we get to that point is extremely important to the result of contact, just as when we get there. Without the proper sequencing and path, limitations to the swing will always occur. Timing is considered vital to the swing. If you’re not “on time” for the pitch, very little damage can be done. But when we look closer what does timing control? 

What Does Timing Control?

Being “on time” with the pitch to me means creating the proper contact point in relation to the hitter's body. The contact point being too far out in front of their front foot can lead to early timing, with vice versa contact being made too close to the hitter's back foot leads the hitter to be late. A hitter's ability to control where in relation to their body they make contact with the ball is crucial to their timing and ability to consistently hit line drives

How Does This Relate to Golf?

  • Golf is a sport with similar movements in the swing as baseball.
  • The only difference is a different plane caused by the ball being on the ground and the fact that the ball is stationary.
  • The ball being stationary allows them to create the optimal contact point and positioning for each shot.
Here's Where It Gets Interesting
  • In golf, much like baseball, different ball flights are required on different swings.
  • With the ball being stationary, the golfer is able to align themselves to the ball differently depending on how they want to shape their ball flight.
  • The image below shows that the more they want to hit upwards on the ball, the farther the ball is moved in front.
golf positioning

Change Doesn't Always Need to be Mechanical

Hit Trax Point of Impact

-Oftentimes when referencing ball flight and a hitter struggling to hit line drives, mechanics is the first thing looked at.

-In actuality, they might have a good swing and don’t need mechanical adjustments; they just make contact too deep in the zone.

-Hittrax gives you the ability to check the point of contact on each swing.

-However, this gives feedback on the ball relative to home plate, not the hitter.

-So, the next time you have a hitter struggling to hit consistent line drives, first check where they make contact and how that can affect ball flight.

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